Jones covers the ambiguity of this expression ‘there had been no erection, there was clearly therefore completion as such’, arguing so it might suggest no penetration, no ejaculation or, more radically, no orgasm.

Jones covers the ambiguity of this expression ‘there had been no erection, there was clearly therefore completion as such’, arguing so it might suggest no penetration, no ejaculation or, more radically, no orgasm.

Hughes (2011) carried out research with a small grouping of heterosexual males within their belated 50s and 60s, the majority of who were experiencing significant infection and impairment which impacted their intimate functioning. He examined the degree to that they continued to attract on heteronormative understandings of sex which conceptualise the penis that is erect the centre of these sex. Though some participants proceeded to define (hetero)sexuality phallocentrically, some would not. One participant, whom reported he had not had an erection since 1994, connected his failure to own penetrative intercourse along with his desire for using women’s garments being spanked or caned, saying ‘I didn’t get a climax but i acquired satisfaction from the jawhorse, it satisfied my brain.’ (op cit, p. 98). Continue reading “Jones covers the ambiguity of this expression ‘there had been no erection, there was clearly therefore completion as such’, arguing so it might suggest no penetration, no ejaculation or, more radically, no orgasm.”